Callahan Financial Planning Opens Marin County Financial Advisory Practice in San Rafael, CA

San Rafael, CA – Jun 17, 2019 – Callahan Financial Planning, a fiduciary financial planning and investment advisory company, has announced the opening of an office in San Rafael, CA following the acquisition of certain assets of the financial advisory firm Gary A. Dossick & Associates. The office is located at 2169 Francisco Blvd E Ste E, San Rafael, CA 94901.

Clients will be served by a team that includes three Certified Financial Planner™ (CFP®) practitioners, a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA®) charterholder, an IRS Enrolled Agent, and supporting staff.

Callahan Financial Planning has seen significant growth since opening in 2010. The firm now manages $125 million in client assets, and anticipates opening additional locations in the San Francisco Bay Area following this expansion.

From this San Rafael office, Callahan Financial Planning anticipates serving clients throughout Marin County, including residents of Mill Valley, Fairfax, Larkspur, Marin City, Corte Madera, San Anselmo, Marinwood, Novato, Sausalito, Tiburon, and Lagunitas-Forest Knolls.

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Nebraska 4797N – Special Capital Gains Election for Tax-Free Stock Sales

The Nebraska Special Capital Gains/Extraordinary Dividend Election, elected and claimed on Form 4797N, can provide a substantial tax break for employees who acquire company stock over their years of employment. This election allows employees who own stock in their employer, or former employer, to exclude that stock’s capital gains income from their Nebraska taxable income under certain circumstances.

Nebraska Special Capital Gains Election 4797N can save taxes on capital gains from employee stock

More and more employers are offering stock purchase plans and stock-based compensation to their employees.

  • Does your employer offer an employee stock purchase program?
  • Do you receive employee stock grants from your employer?
  • Do you own stock in and work for your own company?
  • Did you know that Nebraska offers tax breaks for these situations?

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How to Find the Best Financial Advisor Recommended for Your Situation

The financial advice field is a bit convoluted, but this guide can help.

Financial Advisor Fees/Costs

First, there’s how you pay for advice. All financial advice has a cost, but sometimes it’s explicit (e.g., you can see it), and sometimes it’s only implicit (e.g., it’s embedded inside a financial product, and what you’re paying is not easily visible).

Most financial advisors today describe themselves as fee-based advisors. Legally, this means they can (and generally do) perform their activities in two ways: they earn a commission on certain product sales, and a fee on certain investments. The title is a bit misleading in this way, but the moniker persists.

We think this creates a conflict of interest: it often causes (even if only subconsciously) the financial advisor to recommend things that pay them the best compensation over what is in the client’s best interest.

Because of this inherent conflict, a special sub-set of financial advisor was born: the fee-only financial advisor. We recommend anyone seeking financial advice only work with a fee-only advisor.

A national organization lists and ensures fee-only compliance for all of its members; it’s called the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA), and it has an online directory of all of its members. So, for example, you can search for a list of all the fee-only financial advisors in Omaha, NE or the San Francisco, CA Bay Area (cities where we have offices).

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Understanding Medicare in Retirement

According to AARP, couples age 65 who retired in 2017 were estimated to pay $275,000 for health care over the course of their retirement. This is a 6% increase over 2016’s projections, and over a 70% increase since annual research began in 2002. The majority of retirees will enroll in Medicare to help cover medical costs during retirement. However, there are several things you need to know about how Medicare works, and how to enroll in order to avoid penalties. Read the rest of this entry »

Callahan Financial Planning Adopts CFA Institute Asset Manager Code of Professional Conduct

CFA Institute Asset Manager Code

Callahan Financial Planning Company is proud to announce that the company has adopted the CFA Institute’s Asset Manager Code of Professional Conduct.

Callahan Financial Planning joins approximately 1,400 firms worldwide that have adopted this professional conduct code.

The Asset Manager Code of Professional Conduct outlines the ethical and professional responsibilities of companies that manage assets for clients. This code serves as a point of reference for investors, establishing clear policies on what investors can expect by working with a firm that has claimed compliance with the code. Read the rest of this entry »

The End of File and Suspend for Social Security

(Congress Plans to Close Social Security “Loopholes”)

This week, budget legislation (Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015) passed in Congress to remove the ability for spouses to take advantage of the Social Security strategy commonly known as file and suspend. Previously, the file and suspend strategy allowed Spouse A, at full retirement age, to file and suspend their own retirement benefits to earn delayed retirement credits. This also allowed Spouse B to begin receiving a spousal Social Security benefit at that time (while earning delayed retirement credits on Spouse B’s benefits as well). The new law prevents a spouse from claiming a spousal benefit and later switching to their own benefit.

This strategy, often debated as a “loophole” by some, became possible in 2000, when Congress passed the Senior Citizens Freedom to Work Act. This allowed voluntary suspension of Social Security benefits for people who had already claimed, and then changed their mind and wanted to suspend them later.

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Beginning Retirement During Declining Markets

Retirement portfolios are generally intended to have withdrawals made regularly. These withdrawals provide the regular income necessary for a retiree’s living (and other) needs. However, when a multi-year downturn in the markets is combined with regular withdrawals, a retirement portfolio can deplete at a rapid pace.

The S&P 500 (a broad measure of large American business stocks) averaged a compound annual return over the last century of more than 9% (made up of the change in stock prices plus dividends). This long-term average has been remarkably consistent over long periods of time, but it is a poor predictor of returns over shorter periods of time. Let’s look at some examples to see why. Read the rest of this entry »