Military Tax Break for Nebraska

Nebraska offers a wonderful tax break opportunity for retired military members, and is one we commonly use with clients of our Omaha and Lincoln financial advisors.
Military retirees may be eligible to reduce Nebraska income taxes on their military retirement benefits by filing Form 1040N-MIL.
This tax break is available for retired military members who served active duty, in the National Guard, or as Reservists. For families where both spouses are military members, a Form 1040N-MIL must be filed for each military retiree. Also important to note, Form 1040N-MIL must be filed within two years after the date of separation.

How much can military retirees save on Nebraska taxes?

There are two available options:
  • Option 1: Allows the exclusion from Nebraska taxes of 40% of the military retirement benefit included in federal income. However, this tax break is only available for seven consecutive taxable years, beginning the year of the election; or
  • Option 2: Allows the exclusion from Nebraska tax of 15% of the military retirement benefit included in federal income for all taxable years, beginning with the year in which the retired service member turns 67 years of age.

Making the election

Because Nebraska does not allow changes to the 1040N-MIL, a mistake in making the election could be costly. Above all, filing the tax break election within the two year period is essential. Once the two year period after the date of separation has passed, no election is available.
Consequently, careful planning is required to choose the best option for your retirement situation.
For example, if you are planning to move to another state later in retirement, option 2 might not be advantageous. On the other hand, a separated service member who will not be receiving military retirement benefits until a later date might not see any benefits using option 1.
The timing of the election along with your other factors of retirement income tax timing (consider the tax brackets you might face as the combination of things like Social Security, this pension, required IRA withdrawals, among other factors) along with the date at which the military retirement benefits will begin are factors to consider in optimizing and obtaining this benefit.

Nebraska 4797N – Special Capital Gains Election for Tax-Free Stock Sales

The Nebraska Special Capital Gains/Extraordinary Dividend Election, elected and claimed on Form 4797N, can provide a substantial tax break for employees who acquire company stock over their years of employment. This election allows employees who own stock in their employer, or former employer, to exclude that stock’s capital gains income from their Nebraska taxable income under certain circumstances.

Nebraska Special Capital Gains Election 4797N can save taxes on capital gains from employee stock

More and more employers are offering stock purchase plans and stock-based compensation to their employees.

  • Does your employer offer an employee stock purchase program?
  • Do you receive employee stock grants from your employer?
  • Do you own stock in and work for your own company?
  • Did you know that Nebraska offers tax breaks for these situations?

Read the rest of this entry »

Tax Rates & Retirement Contribution Limits For Individuals & Married Filers in 2019

As we begin gathering up tax documents in anticipation of filing 2018 tax returns, it is also a good time to look ahead to our expected tax liability for 2019. Now is the perfect time to make any adjustments to withholding rates or retirement contributions for this year.

Each year, the IRS adjusts tax brackets to account for inflation. The following brackets took effect on January 1, 2019.

Read the rest of this entry »

Railroad Employees Save Taxes After Supreme Court Ruling

A recent Supreme Court ruling provides potential tax savings for railroad employees. Wisconsin Central Ltd. v. United States holds that stock-based compensation provided to railroad employees is exempt from federal employment taxes. According to the 5-4 ruling, for employees of railroad companies such as Union Pacific and BNSF, stock option income is not considered money remuneration under the Railroad Retirement Act (RRTA) and, therefore, not subject to payroll taxes.

Read the rest of this entry »

New U.S. Tax Law – New Tax Rates for Businesses in 2018

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) passed in December 2017 created sweeping new tax law changes. This article is about businesses and entities. For more information about changes to individual and family income taxation in 2018, see this article.

The following rates took effect January 1, 2018. Read the rest of this entry »

New U.S. Tax Law – Tax Rates For Individuals/Families In 2018

A sweeping new income tax law has been passed (H.R. 1), known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, on December 22, 2017. How will it impact you? Let’s take a look.

The following rates take effect January 1, 2018. Read the rest of this entry »

New U.S. Tax Law – Options To Consider In The Final Days Of 2017

A sweeping new tax law has just passed in the final days of 2017. Given the swift passage of this legislation so close to year-end, taxpayers have been left with limited time to respond proactively. Nonetheless, below are some last-minute options you may have for reducing your taxes due for 2017 (for tax returns prepared in 2018 for tax year 2017). Learn more about this new, December 2017 U.S. tax law that takes effect January 1, 2018 here.

Taking action in this final week of December, 2017 may be helpful for three reasons: 1) itemized deductions will be limited beginning in 2018, 2) tax rates are generally higher in 2017, rendering deductions more valuable in tax year 2017, and 3) ‘lumping’ itemized deductions, such as charitable contributions, together every few years may become more common under the new tax rules given the higher standard deduction and limitations to itemized deductions. Read the rest of this entry »