Military Tax Break for Nebraska

Nebraska offers a wonderful tax break opportunity for retired military members, and is one we commonly use with clients of our Omaha and Lincoln financial advisors.
Military retirees may be eligible to reduce Nebraska income taxes on their military retirement benefits by filing Form 1040N-MIL.
This tax break is available for retired military members who served active duty, in the National Guard, or as Reservists. For families where both spouses are military members, a Form 1040N-MIL must be filed for each military retiree. Also important to note, Form 1040N-MIL must be filed within two years after the date of separation.

How much can military retirees save on Nebraska taxes?

There are two available options:
  • Option 1: Allows the exclusion from Nebraska taxes of 40% of the military retirement benefit included in federal income. However, this tax break is only available for seven consecutive taxable years, beginning the year of the election; or
  • Option 2: Allows the exclusion from Nebraska tax of 15% of the military retirement benefit included in federal income for all taxable years, beginning with the year in which the retired service member turns 67 years of age.

Making the election

Because Nebraska does not allow changes to the 1040N-MIL, a mistake in making the election could be costly. Above all, filing the tax break election within the two year period is essential. Once the two year period after the date of separation has passed, no election is available.
Consequently, careful planning is required to choose the best option for your retirement situation.
For example, if you are planning to move to another state later in retirement, option 2 might not be advantageous. On the other hand, a separated service member who will not be receiving military retirement benefits until a later date might not see any benefits using option 1.
The timing of the election along with your other factors of retirement income tax timing (consider the tax brackets you might face as the combination of things like Social Security, this pension, required IRA withdrawals, among other factors) along with the date at which the military retirement benefits will begin are factors to consider in optimizing and obtaining this benefit.

Nebraska 4797N – Special Capital Gains Election for Tax-Free Stock Sales

The Nebraska Special Capital Gains/Extraordinary Dividend Election, elected and claimed on Form 4797N, can provide a substantial tax break for employees who acquire company stock over their years of employment. This election allows employees who own stock in their employer, or former employer, to exclude that stock’s capital gains income from their Nebraska taxable income under certain circumstances.

Nebraska Special Capital Gains Election 4797N can save taxes on capital gains from employee stock

More and more employers are offering stock purchase plans and stock-based compensation to their employees.

  • Does your employer offer an employee stock purchase program?
  • Do you receive employee stock grants from your employer?
  • Do you own stock in and work for your own company?
  • Did you know that Nebraska offers tax breaks for these situations?

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How to Find the Best Financial Advisor Recommended for Your Situation

The financial advice field is a bit convoluted, but this guide can help.

Financial Advisor Fees/Costs

First, there’s how you pay for advice. All financial advice has a cost, but sometimes it’s explicit (e.g., you can see it), and sometimes it’s only implicit (e.g., it’s embedded inside a financial product, and what you’re paying is not easily visible).

Most financial advisors today describe themselves as fee-based advisors. Legally, this means they can (and generally do) perform their activities in two ways: they earn a commission on certain product sales, and a fee on certain investments. The title is a bit misleading in this way, but the moniker persists.

We think this creates a conflict of interest: it often causes (even if only subconsciously) the financial advisor to recommend things that pay them the best compensation over what is in the client’s best interest.

Because of this inherent conflict, a special sub-set of financial advisor was born: the fee-only financial advisor. We recommend anyone seeking financial advice only work with a fee-only advisor.

A national organization lists and ensures fee-only compliance for all of its members; it’s called the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA), and it has an online directory of all of its members. So, for example, you can search for a list of all the fee-only financial advisors in Omaha, NE or the San Francisco, CA Bay Area (cities where we have offices).

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Assistance After Your Farm Or Ranch Floods

Recent rain, blizzards, and snowmelt from warmer temperatures have caused significant damage across the Midwest in recent weeks.

For those who have been impacted, programs and resources are available through the Farm Service Agency (FSA) to assist farmers and ranchers as they work to recover from the impact of these events.

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Storing Important Documents – What You Should Be Doing Now

Where do you store your important papers and documents? Are they easily accessible in case of an emergency? Do your loved ones know how to get to them if something should happen to you? Here are some tips on what documents you should keep (and where). Read the rest of this entry »

Tax Rates & Retirement Contribution Limits For Individuals & Married Filers in 2019

As we begin gathering up tax documents in anticipation of filing 2018 tax returns, it is also a good time to look ahead to our expected tax liability for 2019. Now is the perfect time to make any adjustments to withholding rates or retirement contributions for this year.

Each year, the IRS adjusts tax brackets to account for inflation. The following brackets took effect on January 1, 2019.

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How to Make Better Decisions

By understanding, identifying, and mitigating the common problems inherent in the decision-making process, we can make better choices and gain greater confidence.

When making important decisions, such as whether to make an investment, how to deal with certain income taxes properly, whether to move, what do to about a new or current job, or how to respond to sharp declines in financial markets (or sharp appreciation), a common process goes as follows:

Common Decision-Making Process Read the rest of this entry »